Annual Title 1 Schoolwide Plan

Overview

Schools receiving Title I, Part A grant funds and implementing schoolwide instructional models are required to develop schoolwide plans in accordance with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended in 2015.

Title 1 Plan

Component 1

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that takes into account information on the academic achievement of children in relation to the challenging state academic standards, particularly the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet the challenging state academic standards and any other factors as determined by the local educational agency.

Evidence:

A systematic effort involving multiple stakeholders to acquire an accurate and thorough picture of strengths and weaknesses of the school community, thus identifying student needs through a variety of information-gathering techniques. A data analysis summary must be included which incorporates benchmarks used to evaluate program results. The results of your data analysis must guide the reform strategies that you will implement to improve instruction for all students.

Multiple Stakeholders:

Grade level teams were involved in systematic data analysis and needs analysis at the end of the 2016-17 school year to determine priorities for this school year.  The findings were shared with the entire faculty during the first week of the school year.  The SIIP team used these findings to determine SIIP goals, which were adjusted due to feedback from Region 2.

Summary of data analysis including a variety of data sources:

In reading, a review of SOL, DRA2, DRAWA and Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessments indicates that reading achievement has stagnated for all students, and continues to be an area of concern for Hispanic, ELLs, students in poverty and students with disabilities.  Woodburn did not meet the AMO in reading for all students, Gap Group 1, Hispanic students, economically disadvantaged students, ELLs and for students with disabilities.  In addition, only 44% of students in grades K-6 made one year’s growth in reading text levels.  Specifically, a need was identified to use best practices during Tier 1 instruction for language arts as outlined in the planning and pacing guides, to increase rigor and accountability for independent reading and writing activities, to continue to work on developing vocabulary for ELLs, to closely monitor students achievement using the universal screener, and to continue refine our Responsive Instruction practices for determining and monitoring individual interventions.

In mathematics, 63% of students in grades 1 and 2 achieved a pass/pass advanced score on the 2017 spring Math Reasoning Assessment, and 75% of all students in grades 3 through 6 passed the 2017 Math SOL test.  Woodburn did not meet AMO for Gap Group 1 students, Hispanic students, economically disadvantaged students, ELLs and students with disabilities.  Needs identified include continuing professional development for using problem based learning and number talks during Tier I instruction, continuing to offer an advanced math class in grades 3 through 5, continuing to use spiraling reviews and assessments to maintain conceptual understanding and skills, and continuing to build the Responsive Instruction process for identifying students, matching them with appropriate interventions and monitoring progress.

Overarching Goal:

Student achievement in mathematics and literacy, grades K-6 will improve and the achievement gap will close through the consistent use of best practices in instruction and implementation of highly effective collaborative learning teams.

Specific Goals:

Based on the literacy and mathematics data above, Woodburn Elementary has set the following Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-oriented, Time-bound and Rigorous (SMARTR) goals for student growth and performance:

Raising the Bar:

By the end of the 2017-18 school year, 90% of students in grades 3 through 6 will achieve pass or pass advanced scores on the 2017-18 English: Reading SOL assessment.

By the end of the 2017-18 school year, 2018, 90% of students in grades K through 2 identified at risk by the universal screener in reading will meet individual end of the year goals as measured by DRA2 tools.

Closing the Gap:

By the end of the 2017-18 school year, 90% of students in Gap Group 3 in grades 3 through 5 will achieve pass or pass advanced scores on the 2017-18 English: Reading SOL assessment.

By the end of the 2017-18 school year, 90% of students in Gap Group 3 in grades K through 2 identified as at risk by the universal screener in reading will meet individual end of the year goals as measured by DRA2 tools.

Budget Implications:

Title I funds will be used to support professional development through use of contracted staffing for a reading and a math resource teacher who will work to build capacity of teachers and provide intervention for small groups of students.  Title I professional development funds will be used to provide midyear planning day for teams to analyze midyear data and plan for instruction.  Title I funds will be used to hire an hourly teacher to provide small group intervention for 6-10 students in grades 1-6, based on needs identified by beginning of the year assessments.

Component 2

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children, including each of the subgroups of students (as defined in section 1111(c)(2)) to meet the challenging state academic standards.

Evidence:

Scientifically-based research strategies based on identified needs and designed to raise the achievement level of all students on content standards. Provide information on how the selected strategies will increase student achievement in under-performing subgroups, if applicable. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Narrative:

Increase student achievement in underperforming subgroups:

The following is a list of proposed solutions within the areas of mathematics and literacy to achieve enhanced learning opportunities for all students, including students in each subgroup, to close achievement gaps:

Mathematics:

  1.  Math Workshop

Differentiated Math Workshop will provide students the opportunity to practice math skills at their current level of understanding while expecting them to deepen their level of understanding.  This model puts students at the center of the instruction, and gives them ample time to problem solve, learn with their peers, and be deeply engaged in learning math concepts.  The workshop model will also be utilized in the advanced math classes in grades 3 through 6.

  1. Collaborative Practices

All grade level teams will collaboratively plan mathematics instruction weekly using the FCPS Planning and Pacing Guide using the PLC cycle and the Concept-Based Unit Planning Tool, to include:

  • Unpacking enduring understandings, essential questions and standards to ensure common understanding of curriculum to be taught.
  • Developing intended learning outcomes (learning targets), pre-assessments, formative assessments and summative assessments.
  • Planning meaningful teacher-led and student-led learning opportunities that support the curriculum and prepare students for summative assessments.
  • Analyzing formative and summative assessment to adjust instruction and provide intervention based on student need.

Advanced math teachers will meet together four times during the year to plan collaboratively and vertically.

  1. Mathematics Professional Development

During monthly Professional Development Mondays, each grade level team will further develop understanding of and expertise in topics supporting best practices in mathematics instruction, to include:

  • Planning and delivering number talks
  • Planning and implementing the Math Workshop
  • Planning and implementing high quality, rigorous and accountable independent work
  • Differentiating process, product and content during the Math Workshop
  • Writing high quality, student-friendly learning targets for mathematics
  • Effectively using problem-based learning tasks

Literacy:

  1. Reading and Writing Workshop

Differentiated Reading and Writing Workshop will provide students the opportunity to authentically learn and practice literacy skills.  Short, targeted focus lessons followed by high quality, rigorous and accountable independent practice is the heart of the model.  Students will also receive guided reading instruction and conferences specific to individual need and instructional reading level.  Adequate time will be provided for independent reading and writing that is purposeful, authentic and accountable.

  1. Word Study and Vocabulary

Consistent and systematic word study will be provided and monitored, based on individual assessment of need.  Vocabulary pertinent to understanding will be emphasized in guided reading and shared reading.  Students will develop individual vocabulary lists based on their reading and content words.  Teachers will provide opportunities for students to use vocabulary in meaningful ways.

  1. Collaborative Practices

All grade level teams will collaboratively plan literacy instruction weekly using the FCPS Planning and Pacing Guide using the PLC cycle and the Concept-Based Unit Planning Tool, to include:

  • Unpacking enduring understandings, essential questions and standards to ensure common understanding of curriculum to be taught.
  • Developing intended learning outcomes (learning targets), pre-assessments, formative assessments and summative assessments.
  • Planning meaningful teacher-led and student-led learning opportunities that support the curriculum and prepare students for summative assessments.
  • Analyzing formative and summative assessment to adjust instruction and provide intervention based on student need.
  1. Literacy Professional Development

During monthly Professional Development Mondays, each grade level team will further develop understanding of and expertise in topics supporting best practices in literacy instruction, to include:

  • Planning and implementing the Reading and Writing Workshop.
  • Planning and delivering short, focused and effective focus lessons in reading and writing.
  • Planning and implementing guided reading and reading and writing conferences.
  • Planning and implementing word study and vocabulary instruction.
  • Differentiating process, product and content during the Reading and Writing Workshop.
  • Writing high quality, student-friendly learning targets for literacy.
  • Developing assessment tasks for literacy, and analyzing student performance on assessment tasks.

Methods to evaluate effectiveness:

  • Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, common formative and summative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and student interviews.  This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions.  Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL).
  • Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTs to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and analysis of assessment data.

Budget Implications:

Title I funds are used to supplement the hours of the Parent Liaison so that she can better assist families.   Title I funds are also used to provide transportation so that families can attend after school academically oriented events such as Literacy and Math nights.

Component 3

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that use methods and instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education.

Evidence:

Scientifically-based research strategies or activities that strengthen and enrich the academic program by: extending the school day; embedding reading and/or mathematics curricula into other instructional areas; or other strategies as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Strategies:

The following strategies will be implemented to strengthen and enhance the overall academic program:

Instructional Practice:

  • Utilize Professional Development Mondays to develop conceptual understanding in mathematics
  • Utilize the Concept-Based Unit Planning Tool and FCPS Planning and Pacing Guides in literacy and mathematics to plan instructional units, including assessments
  • Collaboratively develop learning targets, focus lessons, independent practice and assessments as a part of the unit planning process
  • Solicit assistance from ESOL curriculum teachers to enhance ability to provide effective instruction to older ELLs with limited schooling

Amount and Quality of Learning Time

  • Seek additional funding to provide after school or summer learning experiences
  • Continue to build capacity to deliver effective Morning Meetings focused on relationships and community building
  • Monitor science planning and use of instructional time

Enriching and Accelerating Student Learning:

  • Continue to provide professional development in strategies for advanced learners and advanced academic curriculum
  • Provide coaching from the AART and advanced academic curriculum resource teachers for the new Level IV program
  • Solicit assistance from ESOL curriculum teachers to enhance ability to provide effective instruction to older ELLs with limited schooling

Methods to evaluate effectiveness:

  • Student achievement will be closely monitored in all subject areas in a variety of ways including but not limited to exit tickets, common formative and summative assessments, division assessments, DRA2, and student interviews. This data will be analyzed regularly in CLTs to guide instructional decisions.  Most student data will be housed in the Education Decision Support Library (EDSL).
  • Grade level teams will document the work done in CLTS to strengthen Tier 1 instruction including unpacking content, lesson plans, creation of assessments, and an analysis of assessment data.

Budget Implications:

Title I funding will be used to support Title I math and literacy resource teacher positions that will support professional learning, CLT development and model effective pedagogical strategies for teachers.  Title I funds will also be used to enable a full-time AART to support increasing rigor, use of advanced academic resources, and the new local Level IV program.  Title I funds will support a midyear data analysis and planning day for each grade level team.

Component 4

Provide a description of schoolwide reform strategies that address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards, through activities which may include—

  • Counseling, school-based mental health programs, specialized instructional support services, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ skills outside the academic subject areas;
  • Preparation for and awareness of opportunities for postsecondary education and the workforce, which may include career and technical education programs and broadening secondary school students’ access to coursework to earn postsecondary credit while still in high school (such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual or concurrent enrollment, or early college high schools);
  • Implementation of a schoolwide tiered model to prevent and address problem behavior, and early intervening services, coordinated with similar activities and services carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities  Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
  • Professional development and other activities for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other school personnel to improve instruction and use of data from academic assessments, and to recruit and retain effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects; and
  • Strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs and, if programs are consolidated, the specific state educational agency and local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be consolidated in the schoolwide program.

Evidence:

Scientifically-based research strategies or activities such as student support services; behavior intervention systems; tiered systems of support; teacher recruitment and/or retention activities; or other activities as appropriate. Include a description of how the reform strategies will be evaluated for effectiveness.

Strategies:

The following are proposed solutions to address the needs of at-risk students to assist them in meeting the state’s academic standards:

  1. Social, Emotional, and Mental Health
    • Morning Meetings – teachers will conduct morning meetings using Responsive Classroom resources to build relationships and community.  Professional development will be provided during the pre-service week and further developed during faculty meetings.
    • Positive Character Strengths – teacher will learn about Positive Character Strengths from information from the Positivity Project.  Each quarter, designated strengths will be a focus, culminating in a schoolwide assembly at the end of the quarter.
    • Food for Others – weekend food support will be provided by the food bank and distributed to students in need of support weekly.
    • School Supplies – school supplies and backpacks are made available for students through several local organizations and distributed during a resource fair before the school year begins.
  2. Behavior and Goal-Directed Learning
    • Leadership Council – a leadership council will be established for sixth grade students focusing on school wide projects supporting positive community building and service.
    • PBIS – During current school year, PBIS will be redesigned to focus on positive character strengths and behavior as part of a positive community.  Rewards will be redesigned and phased in throughout the year, with the focus for the first quarter to be on acknowledging positive group behavior.
    • Poor Students, Rich Teaching Book Study – teachers participated in a book study during the summer, 2017 and the following school year to develop increased understanding of mindsets and actions needed to provide an effective educational environment for students impacted by poverty.
  3. School Readiness and Transitions
    • Neighborhood School Readiness Team – Woodburn is a part of a partnership between the Fairfax County Department of Family Services, three elementary schools and early childhood educators and care providers that is focused on school readiness for families and children.
    • Bridge to Kindergarten – Woodburn provided a three week program for students without preschool experience during the summer before their kindergarten year.  Students developed a relationship with the school and learned classroom routines and school behavior expectations.
    • Special Education Preschool and Head Start Transition – Preschool students who are in special education classes in the division are observed by a Woodburn special education teacher prior to the transition from preschool to kindergarten.  Woodburn kindergarten teachers visit Head Start classes serving rising kindergarten students, and receive detailed information about each child’s strengths and needs.
    • Kindergarten Orientation – will be held in the spring for parents and students.  Parents will receive information about the kindergarten curriculum and ways to develop kindergarten readiness.  Children will visit kindergarten classrooms, and literacy and numeracy skills will be screened.  Families will receive kindergarten readiness materials translated into multiple home languages.

Methods to evaluate effectiveness:

Student office referral data will be closely monitored throughout the school year.  A school team will analyze the data for trends at the end of the year, identifying what further professional learning and supports might be needed.  Kindergarten entry data will be reviewed to help identify success of school transition efforts.

Budget Implications:

Title I funds are used to supplement the hours of the Parent Liaison so that she can better assist families, support family connections during the kindergarten transition, and to participate with the Neighborhood School Readiness Team.  Title I funds are also used to provide transportation so that families can attend after school academically oriented events such as Literacy and Math nights.